Saturday, November 13, 2010

Divali 2010

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Divali was celebrated last week in Mauritius. Here are a few photos I took with my camera & the N8.

 

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It all starts of course with the preparation of the sweets… Mixing the ingredients for barfi & boiling of the dholl for thekwa (which eventually wasn’t made due to a lack of time).

 

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Gato zanberique (moong dal).

 

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& of course, gato batate. (Here's the recipe) :)

 

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Thekwa batate.

 

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Wheat ladoo.

 

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Gulab jamun.

 

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Divali wouldn’t be complete without the lighting…

 

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Photos I took 2 days before Divali.

 

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I tried to capture light bokehs using the N8…

 

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Fireworks!

 

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Played with the fireworks mode on my L20, taking advantage of the long exposure time… 4s!

 

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So that’s it. Didn’t have time to take photos of lamps because I was too busy with the electric lighting. & both the L20 & N8 take night photos with extremely high noise.

7 comments

nirvan

Wow! great pictures dude..especially the houses with light works and the bokeh...indeed great preparation! ;) Also, "gato batate" or "gato patate"? The CM6 thing with the fireworks is really creative! Keep it up!

Yashvin

Some nice bokehs out there :-)

carrotmadman6

Thanks both of you.

@nirvan
Patate commonly refers to pomme de terre in French while patate douce is the sweet potato.

Batate is probably the Mauritianised version of Latin batata (meaning sweet potato).
I think the origins of the Mauritian batate is a cross between Hindi batata (potato) & French patate. :)

Siganus Sutor

I've always heard “gato patat” and never “gato batat”. It's totally new to me that some people in Mauritius pronounce it with a b- sound. (Patate comes from Spanish batata, which was itself borrowed from Arawak, the sweet potato being a species indigenous to the American continent.)

carrotmadman6

@Siganus Sutor
Well, I've always heard it more frequently with a b-sound.
& a quick Google search reveals more b- than p-...

Siganus Sutor

I suppose the two sounds (both bilabial consonants) are rather similar and the difference can easily go unoticed. I had never realised that people used the b- sound too. I'll focus more on the lips from now.

And do you have some who say “gato bima” as well? :-)

carrotmadman6

@Siganus Sutor
Haha! Never heard of 'gato bima!' :P

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